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Inspired By Landmannalaugar

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It snapped volcanic ash up several kilometers in the air that resulted in air travel disturbance in northwest Europe for several weeks. The airport closures caused countless passengers to be stranded not just in Europe, but around the globe. Lots of people were mad and blamed Iceland for this annoyance. This resulted in a large threat in tourism for landmannalaugar islandia, because the top grossing season is summer time. Something needed to be done because there was great deal to lose. Within this article I will explain the way the characterized by Iceland disaster management marketing plan exercised, how good the outcomes had been and how it stored Iceland’s tourism potential.

In cases like this, Iceland was confronting disasters concerning terrible publicity and decreases in number of travelers needing to go to the nation within the summer of 2010. Tourism is among the primary financial income resources of Iceland so individuals in the market weren’t looking to a good tourist season. Something needed to be done in order to show people round the planet that Iceland was a fantastic spot to travel to, regardless of the volcano eruption. Iceland’s response was that the Inspired by Iceland effort. The Icelandic advertising agency made a multi-lingual multi-channel plan focusing on Google Universal. They put up Facebook Fan and Like Pages in Addition to YouTube and Vimeo videos have been made. Twitter and blog articles have been just another thing that generated talks about the nation. The plan was to attach Iceland to high profile brands like CNN, John Lennon and Lonely Planet. What’s more, overall search phrases like traveling destinations in Iceland and music festivals were attached. These targeted phrases had close to ten million monthly searches. Based on Kristjn M. Hauksson, the creator of eMarketing, in an interview with Tech News Daily he said that “The door started from the volcano eruption was huge in relation to branding and basic consciousness of Iceland.”

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